BISBEE — Only Bisbee’s Ward 3 will feature an election with more than one candidate, as incumbent Louis Pawlik and Donna Pulling afce off in the primary. Both candidates took time to respond to questions from the Herald/Review; here are their answers.

Louis PawlikIncumbent

Age: 72

Occupation: Retired Civil Engineer

Party Affiliation: Democrat

Family: Spouse, Glynda, three daughters

Tell us a bit about yourself:

Grew up in Tucson. Catalina High School graduated in 1966, University of Arizona graduate 1970 and 1977. Duval Mining Co. 1977 to 1983. Base Civil Engineer and Squadron Commander 1983 to 2003, 162FW, Arizona Air National Guard (Active Duty), retired as Lieutenant Colonel. Moved to Bisbee in Feb, 2017.

H/R: What qualifies you to be a candidate for Ward 3?

Served on Planning and Zoning Commission in Bisbee from Sept 2017 to July 2019. Appointed to Bisbee City Council, Ward III July of 2019. Presently Mayor pro tempore.

H/R: What do you see as the city’s most pressing issue?

City’s most pressing issue at this time is COVID-19, and the associated financial crisis, hand-in-hand with our unmanageable Public Safety Personnel Retirement System debt.

H/R: COVID-19 is taking a severe toll on Bisbee many small businesses and reducing tourism dollars. What are your plans for dealing with the probable, coming economic dilemma?

We are, and have been for some time, in an economic crisis, now made critical by the pandemic. First, identify and eliminate all non-essential spending. Second, lobby for state and federal funding to help us survive the crisis. Third, attempt to convince the voters in Bisbee a 1 percent sales tax increase is necessary if we are to continue providing essential services. Fourth, pray.

Donna PullingAge: 72

Occupation: retired high school teacher

Address: Don Luis neighborhood Bisbee

Party Affiliation: Democrat

Family: Single, 1 married daughter, 3 amazing teenage grandchildren

Tell us a little about yourself, 30 words or less:

From a Pennsylvania, mostly Italian, steel town. We talked politics at the dinner table. Community and education highly valued. I built a recycled home, am an active volunteer. Follow City Council closely.

H/R: What qualifies you to be a candidate for Ward 3?

I’ve lived in the Don Luis neighborhood of San Jose for over 20 years and have been actively involved with this Ward. I know many people from Tin Town, Briggs and Don Luis all the way out to Mountain View and Upper San Jose. It’s a big, diverse area of Bisbee with great potential for growth and prosperity. As I’ve gone knocking on doors talking to people, they tell me they want more employment opportunities, better shopping and a real park for their families. The people want a bigger share of the City’s revenues spent on this area of town.

The Don Luis Neighborhood Block Watch was a successful group that I helped organize. I’ve served on the Parks Commission, Design Review Commission, Sustainability Commission and Bus Commission. I have a good knowledge of the time, study and work it takes to see projects through from beginning to end. Many of the things that have happened in the City started with the commissions I worked with and I’m proud to have had that experience.

It is part of a representative’s responsibility to hold regular, public meetings with their constituents. As a San Jose council representative, I will hold monthly ward meetings inviting/encouraging everyone off all ages and ethnicities to work on their ideas.

H/R: What do you see as the city’s most pressing issue?

Economic Vitality, Infrastructure, Sustainability. Affordable housing and sustainable employment go hand-in-hand. We need to keep our population housed, employed and keep tax dollars here in Bisbee. Tourism is just one leg of the stool. We need to develop other sources of sustainable income and opportunities for all of Bisbee to prosper.

H/R: COVID-19 is taking a severe toll on Bisbee many small businesses and reducing tourism dollars. What are your plans for dealing with the probable, coming economic dilemma?

The COVID situation has presented us with a unique opportunity to rethink our priorities and dependency on tourism as an economic driver. It has also given us a chance to prioritize our spending. We don’t have an economic crisis we have a priorities crisis. Instead of continually borrowing from our reserves and overspending, we should cut spending and diversify our economic growth opportunities.

In 2018 the San Jose Charrette laid out guiding principles for the San Jose District for housing, employment and sustainable growth. As a representative of San Jose, I will work to implement that plan.

A healthy, vital and competitive economy will be dependent upon a diverse work force and an appropriate mix and scale of housing, retail, services and industry. A vision for San Jose should include the provision of community services, a safe and efficient transportation network and adequate infrastructure needed to serve its diverse population.

New development should incorporate design features such as architectural styles, landscaping, beautification, connectivity, multi-modal access and recreational amenities that create a sense of place for new and existing residents of the San Jose District.

Designs for new as well as the improvement of existing development should create opportunities to reduce the carbon footprint of that development through energy efficiency and water conservation, while protecting San Jose’s wildlife corridors, habitat, washes, groundwater and viewsheds.

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