Dear M&M: What do most businesses forget when marketing? – Dave

Dear Dave: I believe it is connecting with your audience to get them to buy. Everyone knows what they do and how they do it. I make donuts. Make the dough, let them raise, put them in a fryer, etc.

People buy because they are interested in supporting why you do it. Yet, we are always telling people what we do and how we do it.

We need to start telling people why we do it. Simon Sinek has a great Ted Talk called it “Start with the Why.” People won’t buy in to what you do without knowing why you do it.

People will buy into why you do what you do versus what you do. In his book, Sinek used Apple as a great example of a company that has successfully conveyed the why in their work to consumers. Apple’s why explains they do what they do to challenge authority looking for the latest, greatest innovation and technology. They explain what they do as designing beautiful products that are easy to use.

What do they do? They happen to sell computers. People are buying the latest and greatest technology. It just happens to be an iPad, iPhone or a smartwatch. Why is the purpose, the cause, or the belief that drives every organization and every person’s individual career?

WHY does your company exist? WHY did you get out of bed this morning? And WHY should anyone care? Your WHY is what sets you apart from everyone else. It’s your purpose. It’s what inspires you to take action. Your WHY is also what inspires others to take action, spread your ideas, or buy your products.

Source: Dean Bokhari’s “How to find your way and communicate your purpose.”

ASK M&M is prepared and submitted by Mark Schmitt, director of the Small Business Development Center at Cochise College; and Mignonne Hollis, executive director at the Arizona Economic Development Foundation. To ask your questions: Call the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Cochise College (520) 515-5478 or email schmittm@cochise.edu or contact the Arizona Regional’ Economic Development Foundation at (520) 458-6948 or email hollism@aredf.org; www.aredf.org.

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