Search / 254 results found

from
to
AP
  • Updated

A community police officer stands guard at the main gate to the Purepecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. In Comachuen the whole town survives because of the money sent home by migrants working in the United States. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

A farmer drives his oxen through the streets of the Puerpecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. Drovers head their teams of oxen into the surrounding hills to haul down freshly cut pine trunks on narrow carts. The traditional textiles, woodworking and construction live on in Comachuen, largely because such enterprises are funded by migrants who send money home to build houses here. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

A Virgin of Guadalupe altar decorates the facade of a home where firewood used for cooking is piled below, in the Purepecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. Money sent home by migrants working in the United States has allowed families to remain in Comachuen rather than moving to other parts of Mexico for work. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

Tranquilino Gabriel works on decorative wood spindles on a primitive lathe using a nail-studded piece of wood, in the Puerpecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. The 59-year-old does this only on his downtime from working in the U.S., to keep his decades-old family business alive. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

A woman runs past two houses in the Puerpecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. Some families build or extend their homes in Comachuen with money they earn in the United States such as the home pictured left. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

Jose Gonzalez and his wife Maria, wait for customers in their corner shop that he remodeled, stocked and extended with money he earned over a decade working in the United States, in the Purepecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

Business administrative student Andres Reyes Baltazar moves a wooden coat rack in the family’s furniture workshop, in the Purepecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. Reyes' father has been going north to work since 2011 because, he says, in the furniture trade “sometimes there are customers, and sometimes there aren’t.” Asencion Reyes Julian spends much of the money he earns in New York to pay for his son’s education. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP wire
  • Updated

Municipal workers clean a sewer line in the Puerpecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. Money sent home by migrants working in the United States has allowed their families to remain in Comachuen rather than moving to other parts of Mexico for work. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
  • Updated

A Virgin of Guadalupe wooden statue is partially illuminated by a pocket of light at a woodworking shop in the Purepecha Indigenous community of Comachuen, Michoacan state, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. Money sent home by migrants working in the United States have kept families fed after local woodworking sales dropped off a decade ago when pine lumber started to become scarce. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)